Transitioning to Clean, Renewable Energy

Australia’s unprecedented, catastrophic 2019-2020 bushfires are directly attributed to climate change and rising global greenhouse gas emissions. Now is the time for Australia to transition to clean, renewable energy.

The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) has shown that Australia can rapidly transition to renewable energy, and that coal can be rapidly replaced without the need for any reliance on gas-fired generation.

Renewables have now surpassed fossil fuels such as coal in their percentage share on Australia’s main grid reaching a new record high in November, 2021. It also marked the first time wind and solar alone delivered more than 60 per cent of grid demand. https://reneweconomy.com.au/wind-and-solar-grab-more-than-60pct-share-of-australias-main-grid-for-first-time/?fbclid=IwAR3CrdZXOpZ70IQOvxD7dMrBrPc6gPrnxFEvMcKnhZiSFJ9APFohS2_rVkk

Green hydrogen technology is beating Blue hydrogen on emissions and financial costs and big business is now investing in the billions in this new technology. Blue hydrogen is produced using natural gas while “green hydrogen” is made by running an electric current through water using an electrolyser powered by renewable energy such as wind or solar. https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2021-01-23/green-hydrogen-renewable-energy-climate-emissions-explainer/13081872

Transport is Australia’s third largest source of greenhouse gas emissions.  This pollution can be radically reduced by accelerating the switch to electric vehicles (EVs) as well as ramping up investment in public and active transport. Electric vehicles are currently very expensive in Australia and consumers have few choices. We need policies and incentives to help EVs compete with older technology.

Hundreds of thousands of Australian jobs can be created by implementing energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, green steel and manufacturing. It makes economic and environmental sense.

ShireCAN members calling for a transition away from coal
ShireCAN members attend the Newcastle Coal Port Blockade

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